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Team One: Wireless Seismocardiogram

Team Members:

Arianne Chung, Alexa Perozo, Alex Giles, Monica Niebles and Diego Midence

Faculty Advisor:

Professor Shuliang Jiao

Company Sponsor:


Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) results from the blockage of blood flow due to plaque buildup on the arterial walls, which causes the stiffening of the cardiac muscles. It is the leading cause of death among cardiovascular diseases and affects 18.2 million adults, predominantly males older than 45. Accurate monitoring of CAD requires the measurement of cardiac mechanical activities (valves opening/closing) and electrical activities(stimulus to the valves). One of the prevalent modes of monitoring is measuring electrical signals through wired/wireless electrocardiography (ECG), although these signals lack information on the heart’s mechanical events. Alternatively, seismocardiography (SCG) focuses on the induced vibration from the heart, providing a clearer understanding of the valve’s movements.

Flexible piezoelectric sensor patches are desirable due to their compatibility with skin’s elasticity and their application in measuring SCG signals. The team’s focus was to design and fabricate a soft sensor to capture SCG frequencies (up to 40 Hz), record real-time data noninvasively, and be placed over the apex of the sternum. The prototype consisted of a commercial piezoelectric (polyvinylidene difluoride) film metalized with a silver conductive ink. The film was patterned into a stretchable configuration, improving its compliance with skin and its sensitivity.

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Team Six: Vibro Beats

Team Members:

Bianca Castello, Jacob Bharat, Yency Perez, Mario Civil, Maria Chiang

Faculty Advisor:

Advisor: Zachary Danziger

Company Sponsor:

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a degeneration of the dopaminergic system that impairs motor function,  resulting in an increased risk of falling and difficulty walking. There are nearly one million people in the US that are affected by Parkinson’s Disease, with more than 60,000 people diagnosed each year. Several clinical studies focused on vibroacoustic therapy have demonstrated the effectiveness of targeted vibration, which is a form of treatment that specifically conducts vibration to a direct area of concern on the body. Target vibration alleviates loss of balance in Parkinson’s patients. Moreover, separate clinical studies have shown that music therapy can potentially promote the release of dopamine and serotonin. The increase in dopamine benefits PD patients by bringing their dopamine levels to a normal range, minimizing the imbalance symptoms that occur from their lack of dopamine.

 

Our proposed solution is to build a lightweight medical device that will slip into a pocket woven into a sock. This technology will conduct the vibrations synchronized with the rhythm of the music directly targeting the Long Flexor Muscle and the Achilles Tendon which surround the ankle. Stimulation of proprioceptors release dopamine to accommodate for the  deficiency that  causes loss of balance in PD patients. The music aspect of this treatment will trigger a release of dopamine that can compensate for the dopamine deficiency caused by Parkinson’s Disease to improve motor function. Simultaneously, the vibration aspect of this treatment stimulate the proprioceptors to strengthen the proprioception pathway for patient’s to regain the spatial awareness of the lower body.

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Team Seven: Manufacturing Process of a SCOBY Bio-Thread

Team Members:

Nathaniel Alexander, Megan Boge, Rene Elvir, Catalina Zambrano, and Sydney Zamorano

Faculty Advisor:

Dr. Anuradha Godavarty

Company Sponsor:

About 6.5 million people experience chronic non-healing wounds. Currently, there are few cellulose-based wound dressings capable of aiding in the treatment of chronic wounds. Cellulose has shown to promote epithelial regeneration or healing. Recent studies performed on bacterial-composed cellulose have demonstrated cellulose’s beneficial characteristics including high tensile strength, flexibility and biocompatibility. Our objective was to develop a cellulose-based SCOBY (Symbiotic Culture of Yeast and Bacteria) Bioactive-Thread towards wound dressing applications. The kombucha tea and proceeding fermentation produces a solid cellulose pellicle byproduct called SCOBY. Our design consists of a four-step process along with the construction of a silicone mold basin for the growth of the bio-thread. The designed and developed SCOBY Bio-Thread was 51.5 cm in length, 1.073 +/- 0.019 mm in diameter, spooled on a 1.0 cm in diameter spool, endured a tensile stress of 6.41 MPa, had a pH of 7.4, and contained cellulose. The successful verification of these properties show the potential for this Bio-Thread to be an excellent alternative material for wound care dressings.

 

Our proposed solution is to build a lightweight medical device that will slip into a pocket woven into a sock. This technology will conduct the vibrations synchronized with the rhythm of the music directly targeting the Long Flexor Muscle and the Achilles Tendon which surround the ankle. Stimulation of proprioceptors release dopamine to accommodate for the  deficiency that  causes loss of balance in PD patients. The music aspect of this treatment will trigger a release of dopamine that can compensate for the dopamine deficiency caused by Parkinson’s Disease to improve motor function. Simultaneously, the vibration aspect of this treatment stimulate the proprioceptors to strengthen the proprioception pathway for patient’s to regain the spatial awareness of the lower body.

Download PDF File

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